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IT MENTAL HEALTH CONSULTANT

Shandrika Potts-Mills - Mental Health Consultant

What is an Infant Toddler Mental Health Consultant (ITMHC)?


An ITMCH helps  promote healthy growth in young children’s social and emotional development.  Guiding and supporting the caregivers/ parent's in children life to recognize, promote & practice positive development. 


  • Providing group and individual staff and/or parent education on mental health issues

  • Assist staff with help for children with atypical behavior or development.


  • Team with family/group family providers to identify and provide interventions for young children, birth to three, who may be at risk of suspension and/or expulsion from care

  • Act as a resource regarding early childhood development with emphasis on emotional and behavioral health and the importance of relationship between the child and parent/guardian;

  • Provide environmental assessments and coaching  to support the classroom and early childhood providers

  • Act as a liaison between family, early childcare provider, and other support agencies in the community;

  • Integrate prevention and intervention on a systems level by participating in systems and community collaboratives;

  • Work collaboratively with community agencies; to provide public education regarding early childhood topics

  • Flexible hours to meet the needs of early childhood educators and childcare agencies (may require some meetings prior to 9am or after 5pm)

  • Maintains confidentiality of all client protected health information and adheres to all HIPAA related to policies and procedures, in compliance with COVID restrictions

For more information contact Shandrika Potts-Mills ITMHC by calling (845) 294-4012 Ext:227 or email  Shandrika@childcarecounciloc.org   

 
Raising Arms

FAQ

 

HOW DO I KNOW WHEN TO WORRY ABOUT A CHILD’S MENTAL HEALTH?

As the person who cares for children, you usually know when a child is struggling with behavioral issues. As children develop and grow, they may have problems from time to time. If a child is acting unusual or seems to have a lot of stress for a long period of time, it may be time to get help. When children have frequent emotional outburst, cannot be soothed, or comforted or is having problems that seem to be getting worse, it is a good idea not to worry alone.

COVID-19 STATS FROM ©2021 CHILD MIND INSTITUTE, INC.,

According to Child Mind Institute, INC,. who conducted a survey  in September 2020 with a representative sample of 351 American parents survey. It was reported a declining well-being: More than two thirds of parents who sought help since the start of the pandemic said they had witnessed a decline in their child’s emotional well-being (72%), behavior (68%), and physical health due to decreased activities/exercise (68%).

Anxiety and depression are most common: Anxiety (40%) and depression (37%) are the most common mental health challenges.  Seeking help for problem behavior (30%), ADHD (30%) or learning challenges (23%) was also common.

WHAT IS ATYPICAL BEHAVIOR/DEVELOPMENT?

Atypical development occurs when the child appears to lag behind of same-age peers in any of the different skills. Missing or Not Meeting Anticipated Milestone is the a way to inquire about assistance.


Here are a few examples of atypical concerns to look for birth-6 months,  intense separation anxiety, unusual fearfulness of people, and extreme shyness.


Language and Communication doesn't watch things as they move, doesn't responds to loud sounds.


 Movement not rolling over in either directions, doesn't bring things to mouth, cant hold head up when pushing up on tummy.



HOW WOULD YOU RESPOND TO THE FOLLOWING SCENARIO IN THE CONTEXT OF A CHILD CARE SETTING?

Steve is calm during morning playtime, but after his nap, he exhibits disruptive behavior. 

Defiant, aggressive students (who are generally referred to with the clinical term "antisocial") are often highly agitated and bring to school a history of noncompliance with parents' instructions and commands (Walker, Colvin, and Ramsey, 1995). 

Answer: Give Steve leading commands involve clear, direct, and specific instructions to students and they allow a fair period of time for a response.

  • Use only as many commands as needed in order to teach and manage the classroom effectively. Research has shown that rates of noncompliance increase as the number of commands increases (Walker, 1995).